Lloyd's Brief: Canadian Legal Perspectives

A collage of construction, railway, canadian flag, wheat and oil rig

August 2014

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Motion for Summary Judgment: Can You Ever Be a Winner?

Pietro Palleschi

Prior to the significant changes to Ontario’s Rules of Civil Procedure in 2010, winning a motion for summary judgment was considered to be somewhat of a miraculous achievement.  The former Rule 20, which governed motions for summary judgment, served to...

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Welcome to Lloyd’s Brief: Canadian Legal Perspectives

Dear Colleagues, Welcome to our first issue of Lloyd’s Brief: Canadian Legal Perspectives. Contributed to by lawyers from Miller Thomson’s national Insurance Group, our goal is to inform you, and to provide readers with coast-to-coast insight into current, cutting-edge legal issues...

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Vancouver’s New Building Bylaw

Karen L. Weslowski

Introduction Unlike any other city or municipality in British Columbia, the City of Vancouver is authorized by the Vancouver Charter to pass its own building bylaws regulating the design and construction of buildings as well as administrative provisions for permitting,...

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British Columbia Case Commentaries

Karen L. Weslowski

The Owners, Strata Plan, BCS 1348 v. Travelers Guarantee Company of Canada, 2014 BCSC (unreported) This case provides some much needed clarity on the relationship between tort claims made by strata corporations against consultants and trades involved in construction and...

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Kent Davidson, Q.C., New Chairman of Miller Thomson to Visit Lloyd’s 8-10 September 2014

Miller Thomson is pleased to announce that Kent Davidson has been elected to the Chairmanship of Miller Thomson LLP. Kent comes to office having led a successful practice in Labour and Employment as well as Commercial Litigation Law, having been...

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When Does the Clock Start to Run? Contribution Claims Under Alberta’s Tort-feasors Act

Mark E. Alexander

At common law, a plaintiff who has been injured as a result of the acts of two or more tort-feasors  – the party committing the wrongdoing – can sue any one of them to recover 100 per cent of his...

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Proposed Changes to the Quebec Code of Civil Procedure and Their Impact on the Litigation Process: Part 1

Fadi Amine

The Province of Quebec recently enacted a new Code of Civil Procedure (the “CCP”), which is expected to come into force during the Fall of 2015. The CCP is intended to address long-standing, systemic problems that have adversely affected the...

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Displaying 1-7 of 7