Shannon Sturgeon

2019 Summer Student | Vaughan

905.532.6625

Portrait of Shannon Sturgeon

Shannon currently studies law at Queen’s University Faculty of Law. Prior to law school, Shannon completed a Bachelor of Commerce, majoring in Finance. As part of her program, Shannon spent three semesters working in a variety of organizations in accounting, audit, and financial analyst roles.

In law school, Shannon completed an externship with the Department of Justice in Ottawa. She assisted with legal research and attended a judicial review of an administrative tribunal at the Federal Court. Shannon was also a volunteer with Pro Bono Students Canada. In collaboration with her colleagues, Shannon created a policy for a Kingston non-profit organization with regard to new federal legislation. In addition to gaining practical legal experience, Shannon also sat as a member of Queen’s University’s Law Students Society Faculty and Student Awards Committees.

Throughout her undergraduate studies, Shannon was a teaching assistant in both the Commerce and Chemistry Faculties. She taught a range of courses to students in all years of undergraduate study and also provided tutoring services to upper year students. In addition, Shannon provided career advisory services to first year students in anticipation of their work placements. In her final year, Shannon completed a year-long consulting project for a Nova Scotia non-profit, exploring potential avenues to expand their clientele.

Shannon is also an active member of the Ontario Sailing Community. In her spare time, she enjoys baking, home renovation projects, and scuba diving.

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Over-Involved Adult Children Run the Risk of Invalidating a Parent’s Will or Power of Attorney: The Case of Graham v Graham

For a will to be valid, not only is it important that formal statutory requirements be satisfied,[1] but the testator (being the person executing the will) must also have testamentary capacity to make the will. In addition, if the testator...

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