Lloyd’s de Londres et assurances internationales

Les membres de notre groupe comprennent parfaitement les mécanismes de l’assurance, qui consistent à évaluer les risques, à les gérer et à intervenir efficacement lorsque survient un sinistre. Notre équipe spécialisée dans les principes de souscription du Lloyd’s de Londres et dans le domaine des assurances internationales est l’une des mieux dotées en effectifs au Canada. Nos avocats mettent à la disposition des sociétés de courtage, compagnies d’assurances, sociétés d’assurances captives et compagnies de réassurances une gamme complète de services, y compris des programmes autogérés de gestion des franchises. Notre équipe est en mesure de négocier le contenu et la portée des contrats d’assurance et de régler les litiges, entre autres dans les secteurs suivants : responsabilité professionnelle, responsabilité liée aux produits, assurance des biens, assurance des produits financiers et assurance médicale.

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Ontario Limitations: Waiting to Complete Examinations for Discovery to Identify Potential Tortfeasors?

In Galota v. Festival Hall Developments Ltd. et al., 2015 ONSC 6177 (“Galota”), the Ontario Superior Court of Justice pushed the boundaries of discoverability in the context of limitation periods.  While the case addresses a personal injury claim, the implications...

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Director’s Liability for Corporate Negligence

Plaintiffs often cast the net broadly to capture every party with assets or insurance capable of satisfying a potential judgment.  Directors are often named as defendants in claims related to the negligence of the companies they oversee. Under Canadian law,...

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The Latest Word from the Ontario Court of Appeal on the Insurance Tripartite Relationship: a Cautionary Reminder

The general concept of the tripartite relationship is a familiar one to those in the insurance industry:  An insurer retains a  lawyer to represent its insured in a civil proceeding.  The lawyer’s primary duty and loyalty is to the insured,...

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Counsel-Expert Communications: Everything Old is New Again

In December 2014, we had left off with the Ontario Superior Court, in Moore v Getahun[1] (“Getahun”), having decided that the historically accepted practice of counsel reviewing drafts of their expert’s reports should stop, and that all instructions provided by...

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Absence of Statutory Warning turns Victory for the Vehicle Leasing Industry into Loss for the Insurer

In the province of British Columbia, vehicle owners, including leasing and rental companies, are vicariously liable for the negligence of permissive drivers of their vehicles.  Damages recoverable against lessors, however, are capped by statute at CDN $1 million (a provision...

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A Year on the Books: Reflections on Summary Judgment in Alberta

January 2015 marked the one-year anniversary of the Supreme Court of Canada’s landmark decision in Hryniak v. Mauldin,[1] which clearly articulated a cultural shift aimed at facilitating a fair process for the just adjudication of disputes, with simplified and proportionate...

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Pollution Resulting From Fire is Not “Pollution”, says BC Court

Virtually every modern CGL policy contains some variation of the “absolute pollution exclusion”, which eliminates or severely restricts coverage for environmental damages. In recent years, the courts in British Columbia and elsewhere have consistently upheld such exclusions in relation to...

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How Real is the Risk for Professionals Who Design an Immovable Work in Quebec?

In Quebec, there are two kinds of property: immovables and movables. The notion of ‘immovable work’ includes all immovable structures of considerable size. Any constructions and works of a permanent nature would be characterized as immovables. The interpretation of an...

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What To Do With Sleeping Dogs: Dismissal for Delay

In most Canadian jurisdictions, a plaintiff’s claim can be dismissed for delay. Lord Salmon, in Fitzpatrick v. Batger & Co., [1967] 2 All E.R. 657, articulated the problem of dormant claims, as follows: [The defendants] no doubt, however, were relying...

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When Does the Clock Start to Run? Contribution Claims Under Alberta’s Tort-feasors Act

At common law, a plaintiff who has been injured as a result of the acts of two or more tort-feasors  – the party committing the wrongdoing – can sue any one of them to recover 100 per cent of his...

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